News That Means Business

June 26, 2014

The Hardest Working 140 Characters in Social Media

10 Tips for Getting More Out of Twitter

You’re on Twitter… for all the right reasons… to engage your customers, find new ones, watch trends, make announcements, track your competitors, manage your reputation and create buzz.

And you’ve mastered the basic tweet formats, terminology, and tools. So your profile page is solid, and followers are growing.

To fly like a bird and soar even higher, following are some ways to gain altitude using this massively popular micro-blogging platform.

  1. The Top Tip

    Twitter is a community, not a billboard. Overtly promotional tweets are the equivalent of spam email. You can describe your products and services – that’s why you’re there – but use helpful, informative terms. Otherwise, advertise and pay for sponsored tweets.

  2. Get Re-Tweeted

    When followers re-tweet your posts, they engage with you and amplify your message to their followers (which can bring new followers to you). Make this happen with quality tweets. Use 120 characters, instead of 140 to make it easy for a re-tweeter to add a comment. Re-tweet others whenever you can, as well, and thank people who re-tweet you.

  3. Incorporate Images into Your Tweets

    Use infographics, photos, and video links to receive more re-tweets and click-throughs.

  4. Use Hot Words

    The most re-tweeted posts on Twitter contain the following 12 words/phrases: “you, please, retweet, free, help, great, 10, follow, how to, top, check out, and new.”

  5. Use Hashtags

    A hashmark (#) preceding a word or phrase will organize tweets into easy-to-find subject categories. People searching for information on a specific topic (like tax preparation or fitness bands) will find you more easily through a relevant or original tag. But limit them to no more than two per tweet.

  6. Get in on Conversations

    Twitter is all about conversations, so jump in, and reach beyond your current followers. You’ll reach new targeted audiences, get your name out there, and learn more about your market. Explore hashtagged topics or trending topics, and read to find out what others report and how you can contribute. You can start a conversation as well with a provocative question or a request for opinions.

  7. Timing Is Everything

    Tweet when your audience is engaged. In general, try Monday-Thursday from 1 to 3 PM – a known prime time, and avoid Friday after 3 PM. More specifically, consider the habits and time zones of your target users. Try a service such as Tweriod to identify your unique prime time slots. The cost is minimal and worth it. Other services such as Buffer, HootSuite, or Sip Social can pre-schedule your tweets so you don’t have to be on 24/7.

  8. Be Active but Not Too Active

    Three to seven tweets per day in 50-minute intervals is a suggested activity rate.  Tweet too much, especially with promotional messages, and you’ll quickly find yourself un-followed.

  9. Put Links in Your Tweets

    Provide links to other social media and your website. If you’re sharing news or an article, link to it. Shorten links with bit.ly or use the link shortening function at Twitter.com to keep it brief.

  10. Monitor Your Performance and Fine-Tune Your Tweets

    Monitor your Twitter activity (and all your social media) in real-time with Tweet Deck. Other popular, multi-featured monitoring services can be found on Sprout Social and Hootsuite. Study your Twitter performance regularly (just as you do your web analytics) with Twitter Analytics or with services like TweetReach, Buffer or Tweet Deck. Base your future tweets on past performance.

With its symbols, space limits and unique glossary, the Twitterverse is a world of its own. It may present a steeper learning curve than Facebook or LinkedIn, but it’s a must-have marketing tool. Take time to master it and put all its power to work for your business.

Reach out to us with any questions at (201) 796-7788 and be sure to follow us on Twitter at @CarylComm.

June 16, 2014

Tap the Power of LinkedIn: 7 Steps to Success in the World’s Largest Online Business Community

It’s a community of over 300 million professionals in 150 industries worldwide – many of whom make key decisions for their companies. And it offers unique tools for reaching the key people on your business radar. Invest a little time in mastering this leading B2B platform and you’ll reap some unique returns. Here are seven steps to help you get started on LinkedIn or enhance your current experience there.

  1. The Company Page
  2. If you own or manage a company, this page is your storefront, your business card. It communicates the essence of your brand and tells your corporate story. Through it, you can connect to your network of current and potential customers and keep your organization top of mind through updates to your page. Through LinkedIn’s search function, other members can find your products or services easily.

  3. Content is Key
  4. Your success depends on strong content that describes what you do and why you’re unique. This content should be succinct and share-able. Every time a visitor engages with your content by sharing it with followers, your message is amplified, your reach extended and your profile raised.

    What makes content share-able? Useful information – tips, trends, offers – will likely be shared. If that useful information is paired with an interesting visual, the likelihood of sharing increases. Include video demos, case studies, free downloads, white papers, e-books on your company page. What’s not likely to get shared are promotional posts (unless they are very entertaining ads). This doesn’t mean that you can never be self-promotional on your page. You will want to make new product announcements, for example, and include client endorsements or testimonials. Be guided by the 80/20 rule that says 80 percent of your content should be informational, and only 20 percent promotional.

  5. Update and Target
  6. You’ve created a great page, but now the work is just beginning. To keep it effective, you need to continue posting regularly, at least a couple of times a week. This keeps you and/or your company alive on the pages of your followers and keeps your own page looking active and current. Where will you get enough content? First, remember that quality of content is more important than quantity. One substantive post is better than five spammy ones. Consider a tip of the day or a comment on industry news, preferably in the morning when LinkedIn members are most engaged. Share a post from a follower or comment on an interesting article and include its link. Share relevant comments from your page or share a post from a thought leader. Pull in content from your company or personal blog or Twitter feed. Invite reviews of your products/services. Start conversations by replying to comments. Or post a provocative question to your followers (their answers might make great future posts). You’ve got more content resources than you think you have.

  7. Win the Search Game with Optimization
  8. Optimize your LinkedIn company or personal page just as you do your website, seeding keywords throughout your text. These keywords will point LinkedIn members searching those terms to your page. The Google search bots also scan LinkedIn pages. Select a word or phrase that describes your core offering: “copyright attorney,” “online security software,” “commercial real estate management.” Then add a few variants or use a few of the key words on your website. Incorporate keywords into your main description and repeat them frequently in the first paragraphs of the descriptive text and in sub-heads.

  9. Build a Following
  10. What’s a LinkedIn page without followers?  Expand yours by constantly reminding your contacts of your LinkedIn presence. Put the “Follow Me” button on all your outreach content: website, blog, all social media, corporate stationery and business cards, print ads and collateral, annual reports and in the email signature block of your entire staff. Mention your page via your social media accounts. Call attention to your latest LinkedIn posts on your blog. Invite your customers, partners and prospects to follow you. If you have a company page, encourage your staff to have personal LinkedIn pages. Personal pages have automatic links to the member’s company pages, giving you amplified exposure to the networks of your team.

  11. Use Metrics to Measure Your Company Page’s Performance
  12. If you use Google Analytics for your website, you know how useful performance metrics can be. LinkedIn’s analytic system will deliver the same type of data for your company page. Review these reports regularly and revise your content according to the keywords, visuals and topics commanding the most engagement. Among other valuable feedback, these stats will also give you a picture of visitor demographics and provide you with a comparison of your page vs. others in your industry or market.

  13. Get Known as an Expert
  14. LinkedIn is known for its discussion groups, where business people and professionals “meet” to exchange advice and share information and ideas. There are over 2 million of these, covering thousands of industries and special interests. Participation is limited to individuals, so you can’t join a group or comment as a company, but your executives can join and comment from their own pages. Encourage their participation in relevant groups to build your company’s name and reputation through the expertise of your management.

    Thought-leader status is earned by consistent participation and a helpful attitude. Answer questions, share experiences, but DON’T sell or promote your products/services overtly. Your expertise and attitude will drive customers your way, not your sales pitch.

Don’t miss out on LinkedIn. Get more active, using the seven tips above. Once you engage with this unique platform, you’ll find you can’t do without it.

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